Employers May Not Inquire About Salary History

New Jersey Assembly Bill 1094 (AB1094) prohibits employers from asking about an applicant’s current or previous salary. The bill states that it is unlawful for any employer to:

  • Screen applicants based on their salary history. This includes but is not limited to their wages, salaries and benefits.
  • Require that a job seeker’s current salary satisfy any minimum or maximum criteria.

If an applicant voluntarily discloses their salary without prompting or coercion, then the employer may consider and verify this information. Employers may also request that the applicant provide written authorization to confirm their salary history.

AB1094 creates some exemptions, such as applications for internal transfers or promotions, and penalties for violations.

Consumer Reporting Agencies Must Make Consumer Reports Available In Spanish And Certain Other Languages

Consumers have the right to find out what data a Consumer Reporting Agency (CRA) has on file about them. New Jersey Senate Bill 3452 (SB3452) specifies that CRAs must, upon request, provide that information in Spanish or any other language the Director of the Division of Consumer Affairs determines is a first language for a significant number of consumers in the state.

Effective December 8, 2017

Amendments To The Existing Ban The Box Law

New Jersey initially implemented a Ban The Box law in 2014. Governor Chris Christie signed Bill S-3306 in December 2017, which adds new regulations that law. It specifies:

  • Employers may not ask about criminal records, including expunged records, on job applications.
  • Employers may not make oral, written or online inquiries about an applicant’s criminal records, including expunged records, during the initial application process.

Effective December 8, 2017

New Laws For Expunging Criminal Records

This bill creates a shorter wait time to expunge records and adjusts the number of requests that can be made at once. Individuals who meet the criteria may:

  • Apply to have records expunged in 6 years (previous wait time was 10).
  • Request to have 4 offenses expunged (previous limit was 3).
  • Request to have the waiting time for an expungement decreased if the only active issue is the need to pay a fine or restitution and the court feels expunging the records is in the best interest of the public.

Effective June 29, 2017

New Laws For Expunging Juvenile Criminal Records

This bill creates a shorter wait time to expunge juvenile records. Individuals who meet the criteria may:

  • Apply to have records expunged in 3 years (previous wait time was 5).
Backgrounds Online provides details about State Laws for informational purposes only. We do not provide legal services. Nothing on these pages or our site should be considered as legal advice or opinion.